DestinationsDespite risks of a second wave of infections in mainland China, current restrictions expiring on 7 May have motivated Hong Kong’s travel agencies to open bookings for trips over the border starting May

Travel agents are promoting trips to mainland China, but is it too early?

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Trips in May to destinations in China, including Hangzhou, are being offered by Hong Kong travel agents.
Trips in May to destinations in China, including Hangzhou, are being offered by Hong Kong travel agents. Photo Credit: zhudifeng/i/Stock/GettyImagesPlus

HONG KONG - A second day running of single-figure infection rise and Hong Kong’s travel agents have jumped to offer mainland tour bookings starting as early as May.

Clients are just as keen to travel, and tours have been snapped up already according to an employee at Sunflower Travel, where a trip to Shanghai for six days will cost approximately HK$2,700 (US$348)

Quarantine measures are still operating, but with restrictions currently set to relax on 7 May the travel industry stakeholders are not letting the opportunity of possible trips go by for a second.

The caveat is, of course, that should the government extend restrictions or infections worsen then tour details may change.

Tours to popular mainland cities like Shanghai, Beijing, Hangzhou and many Guangdong destinations have been promoted by agencies such as Hong Thai, Morning Star and Sunflower Travel with options to leave as early as 1 May.

Clients are just as keen to travel, and tours have been snapped up already according to an employee at Sunflower Travel, where a trip to Shanghai for six days will cost approximately HK$2,700 (US$348).

“We are resuming bookings in advance, but if the government extends the quarantine and travel alerts, we may cancel the trips later,” Sunflower said. “If not, these trips are already booked by customers and will go ahead accordingly.”

Meanwhile other agencies are promoting tours more conservatively starting in June.

Jason Wong Chun-tat, Travel Industry Council chairman has gone on record saying that he believes May will be too early for travel and the industry is waiting on the government’s guidelines on which cities in the mainland will be safe.

“Consumers should evaluate the risks as well, but these tours in May would be very likely cancelled under the current circumstances,” he said.

Due to the risk of a second wave of infections respiratory expert at Chinese University Dr David Hui Shu-cheong has suggested a city is only safe to visit after 28 days without new infections.

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