Travel TechnologyCountries around the world are offering remote workers love and amazing locations.

Hey digital nomads, it's not just about Bali

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Governments that fail to address remote work in immigration policies is “a missed opportunity”, says a new report from the Migration Policy Institute.
Governments that fail to address remote work in immigration policies is “a missed opportunity”, says a new report from the Migration Policy Institute. Photo Credit: GettyImages/Farknot_Architect

Digital nomads rejoice. Countries around the world are falling over themselves to attract remote workers to their shores with incentives ranging from special airfares to accommodation.

It’s not just Bali that is trying to tempt digital nomads to work and play in Canggu or Ubud and, in the process, boost a local tourism economy devastated by the Covid pandemic.

How about Curaçao in the Caribbean, part of the Leeward Antilles? Digital nomads can set up base in the Dutch colonial town of Willemstad, relax between work sessions on beautiful beaches and stay six months with the possibility of an extension for another six months.

A new report from the Migration Policy Institute reveals that more than 25 countries offer visa programmes for digital nomads, allowing them to work legally with few constraints.

Curaçao too far away? Prefer Spain? Nearly 30 small municipalities in Spain have come together to form the National Network of Host Villages for Teleworking to encourage remote workers to stay in their rural towns and villages.

For those seeking islands in the sun, Greece offers digital nomads an income tax reduction of 50% for a period of seven years to certain nationalities who commit to staying a minimum period of two years.

Another example? Argentina plans to offer digital nomads differential rates on accommodation, co-working spaces and internal flights with Aerolíneas Argentinas.

Requirements for digital nomad visas vary from country to country, but most are configured to ensure visa holders can support themselves without taking local jobs.

Kate Hooper and Meghan Benton, authors of the Migration Policy Institute, say that governments failing to address remote work in immigration policies is “a missed opportunity”.

“Growing remote work practices and norms could help revive declining regions if firms recruit workers living away from company headquarters or individuals move to less expensive areas to stretch their salaries
further and access more plentiful housing,” the authors added.

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