DestinationsSizzling temperatures this year may make travellers reconsider summer holidays in Europe in the coming years.

Winter may become Europe's new hot season for holidays

|
The sizzling heat in Europe this summer is causing travellers to feel frazzled during their vacations.
The sizzling heat in Europe this summer is causing travellers to feel frazzled during their vacations. Photo Credit: GettyImages/frantic00

Changing weather patterns around the world – hotter summers such as those experienced in Europe this year – could be the start of a major shift in how travellers may reconsider travelling during the same time next year and how the travel industry prices periods of peak demand.

As tourists from Rome to London sought shade and water to seek respite from the hotter-than-ever mid-summer temperatures, some were rethinking the timing of their annual holiday if, as forecast, climate change continues to rearrange the four seasons of the year in the northern hemisphere.

Travel intelligence provider Mabrian says: “This year saw heat records broken in most of the main Europe summer tourism destinations, in some cases by quite significant margins, and climate experts are predicting that many places popular with tourists will be scorching hot every summer.”

Travel agents sending clients to Europe will need to take note of these climate-influenced changes. During this summer’s heat wave in Europe, Mabrian noticed a clear drop in visitor satisfaction levels during the hottest weeks in key holiday destinations, including Spain, Greece, France, and the UK.

During this summer’s heat wave in Europe, travel intelligence provider Mabrian noticed a clear drop in visitor satisfaction levels during the hottest weeks in key holiday destinations, including Spain, Greece, France, and the UK.

Carlos Cendra, sales and marketing director at Mabrian, says: “If anyone thinks that hotter weather is good news for traditional beach destinations then they should think again.

“Hundreds of vacation destinations in the Mediterranean and North Africa have traditionally based their tourism development on favourable weather conditions. Now this is changing, and faster than we thought.”

Mabrian asked several industry experts whether winter could become the new summer and whether tourists would prefer to visit destinations where the climate was more bearable.

Among the responses, there was concern about the likely impact of climate change on how hoteliers priced hotels, how developers construct hotels, and how airlines might have to rethink the seasonality of their peak fares.

Alex Barros, chief marketing and innovation officer from Beonprice, the revenue management and total profitability platform for the hospitality sector, said: “From a revenue management perspective for hoteliers this is a potentially enormous change as pricing for leisure travel has all been defined by the same summer peak season approach since the beginning of mass tourism in the 1960s.

“More research will be needed around how temperatures impact consumer demand. What is the ideal temperature for maximum pricing? Is it impacted by temporary volatility in temperatures, or just long-term averages?

“All of this will of course impact how hoteliers approach building and opening new properties too, not just location but temperature-controlled buildings and communal areas.”

Bruno Martins, senior product manager from the global hospitality technology provider Shiji Group, says hotels and resorts in hotter locations would have to re-think their outdoor relaxation areas, perhaps even charging for peak hours.

Martins says technology will be “the golden-thread” throughout these changes. “Whether that be via apps that allow guests to schedule better those precious cool moments, pricing software that maximises revenues based on temperature, or electronic wrist bands that allow guests access to certain locations at certain times, based on demand.”

Up, Up and Sail Away Into Opportunities
July - September 2022 eBook

As ports of calls resume in Southeast Asia, it’s time for travel agents to take advantage of the sea of opportunities in cruising and grow their business.

Read Now



JDS Travel News JDS Viewpoints JDS Africa/MI