CruiseLittle meets large at the bottom of the world

When it’s good to be a small cruise ship

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Stella Australis meets Queen Mary 2 off Cape Horn.
Stella Australis meets Queen Mary 2 off Cape Horn.

Cunard’s 149,999-tonne Queen Mary 2, on a four-month round-the-world voyage, is 55 times bigger than Australis’ 2716-tonne expedition vessel Stella Australis, which was pictured during a three-night glacier and fjord sailing from Ushuaia to Punta Arenas. 

One of the world’s biggest cruise ships, the 2600-passenger Queen Mary 2, met one of the smallest, the 210-passenger Stella Australis, off Cape Horn at the bottom of the world in Patagonia on February 11 just after the 400th anniversary on January 29 of the discovery and naming of the fabled cape.

Cunard’s 149,999-tonne Queen Mary 2, on a four-month round-the-world voyage, is 55 times bigger than Australis’ 2716-tonne expedition vessel Stella Australis, which was pictured during a three-night glacier and fjord sailing from Ushuaia to Punta Arenas.

While passengers aboard QM2 were not able to step ashore at Cape Horn, Australis – as the only cruise line based in the region – was able to ensure all 210 passengers on Stella Australis were able to go ashore to explore the cape via the ship’s zodiac boats.

Australis offers regular expedition cruises from Ushuaia and Punta Arenas to the glaciers and fjords of Tierra del Fuego, the Magellan Strait, Beagle Channel and Cape Horn.

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