CruiseNew itineraries, more cooperation with industry stakeholders and a greater MICE focus all part of the strategy.

Royal Caribbean bringing more options to Malaysia

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RC Malaysia-Spectrum of the Seas190225
Spectrum of the Seas.
RC Malaysia side bar-Angie Stephen190225
Angie Stephen, associate director and managing director Asia Pacific, Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.

Quantum of the Seas will be offering three- to seven-night South-east Asia cruises from this November, and the new Quantum Ultra Class ship, Spectrum of the Seas, will offer three- to nine-night South-east Asian cruises in May, according to Angie Stephen, associate director and managing director Asia Pacific, Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.

Royal Caribbean International is celebrating its 50th Anniversary this year with several initiatives to increase its share of the market, starting with the launch of new cruises onboard its Quantum Class ships, the largest in Asia. 

Quantum of the Seas will be offering three- to seven-night South-east Asia cruises from this November, and the new Quantum Ultra Class ship, Spectrum of the Seas, will offer three- to nine-night South-east Asian cruises in May, according to Angie Stephen, associate director and managing director Asia Pacific, Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.

The itineraries available across the three ships include three-night cruises to Penang/Port Klang; four-night cruises to Port Klang/Penang and Melaka; four-night cruises to Port Klang/Penang and Phuket; five-night cruises to Port Klang/Langkawi, Penang and Phuket.

“The 5,622-guest Spectrum of the Seas is the first ship in the fleet that is custom-built for the Asian market and will feature an array of next-generation experiences and amenities including a VR bungee trampoline, elevated glass capsule, skydiving simulator and a two-deck Ultimate Family Suite with an indoor slide,” noted Stephen.

She added that the addition of Melaka as one of the Malaysian stops requires that dredging works be conducted to allow the ship to access the dock.

Stephen found that Malaysians favour sailings to South-east Asian destinations such as Phuket, Bangkok, Penang and Langkawi but also enjoy RCCL’s Mediterranean cruises.

Stephen said Royal Caribbean enjoyed close cooperation with the Malaysian tourism authorities and appreciated their efforts at promoting the industry and helping to remove barriers, and ensuring smooth processing of passengers.

“We would love to see destination growth in terms of dedicated cruise facilities, and work with the authorities towards some set KPIs for clearance both for vessels and guests. Moving forward, we are keen to explore more opportunities to work with local partners on cruise promotion and port development,” she said.

An example of a recent effort is the cruise line’s joint venture with Penang Port for terminal upgrading. Plans include extension of the existing berths to berth two Quantum Class ships at any one time.

RCCL is also looking to expand its share of MICE bookings, which currently stand at single digits in percentage share, by creating a dedicated team to serve event planners and corporations. 

“Our packages will include the whole experience as the AV equipment, the event space, the F&B and entertainment, our other facilities like sky diving, the virtual reality games are part of the price. We can even do customised cruises with smaller ships requiring six months advanced notice and the larger ones maybe one and a half year’s notice,” pointed out Stephen.


Stephen said Royal Caribbean can provide site visits to event planners and has a toolkit and guide for events and meetings and training materials available online. The e-learning tool is available in 10 languages – English, Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Spanish, French, Italian, Portuguese, German and Russian.


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